Schneiderman kicks off National Financial Literacy Month with consumer alert about common tax season scams

With this year’s tax deadline looming and April marking National Financial Literacy Month, Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman offered New Yorkers tips to avoid falling victim to reported tax season scams. The attorney general also asked taxpayers to notify his office of any suspected fraudulent schemes designed to steal personal and financial information from consumers.

“Some of the most common scams reported to my office involve fraudsters targeting consumers during tax season, and I hope New Yorkers remain vigilant leading up to Tax Day,” Schneiderman said. “By keeping in mind a few basic tips and reporting suspected fraud, consumers can stay safe and ensure that they get to keep the full tax refund to which they’re entitled.”

In an effort to help New Yorkers avoid tax-themed scams, the attorney general’s office offers the following tips:

  • The IRS and legitimate government agencies never demand payment by phone;
  • If you owe money, you will receive a legitimate notice in writing that identifies the agency and the reason you owe money;
  • Do not give out personal information, including your Social Security number or bank account information, to telephone callers;
  • Legitimate government organizations will never threaten arrest or deportation for failure to pay a debt;
  • Legitimate government agencies will never insist consumers pay a debt only via a pre-paid credit card.

The following suggestions will help consumers file their tax returns safely and keep more of their return:

  • If you use a tax-preparation service, use only established and recognizable companies;
  • Check the tax preparer’s qualifications and history through the Better Business Bureau (bbb.org);
  • Ask for a written estimate of all fees; avoid those who base their fees on a percentage of your refund;
  • Make sure the tax preparer is accessible, even after the April due date;
  • Never sign a blank return;
  • Review entire return before signing;
  • Make sure the preparer signs the tax form and includes a preparer tax identification number (PTIN);
  • Consult New York’s “Consumer Bill of Rights Regarding Tax Preparers.”

For more tips, click here.

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